Institute at Brown for Environment and Society

Past Events

Miriam Rothenberg, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation, “Community and Corrosion: A Contemporary Archaeology of Montserrat’s Volcanic Crisis in Long-Term Comparative Perspective”, in a public lecture via Zoom. All are welcome.

Watch a recording of the event: Rothenberg - Community and Corrosion: A Contemporary Archaeology of Montserrat’s Volcanic Crisis in Long-Term Comparative Perspective

Register

As fires rage across the western U.S. and elsewhere, it has become clear that wildfires present enormous ecological, societal, and economic challenges to our modern world, tipping the balance and harmony of ecosystems and society. But what the apocalyptic images coming out of San Francisco and Portland don’t show is the long-term impacts of these problems, and what we can do about them. This panel will look at why we are seeing larger and more intense wildfires, how they create lasting repercussions to our health and economy, and what can be done to address them. We will talk to Brown alumni and experts in the field to get a clear sense of the problem and its possible solutions. We will discuss climate change and 20th-century forest management as problem accelerators, and how modern thinning and burning practices that open forests and protect large trees can improve conditions. We will talk about good and bad fire and smoke, and the lasting impacts of increased wildfire smoke on human health. Finally, we will hear from people who are implementing innovative financial approaches to address this growing problem. This is a primer on the hot, fiery, and smoky future that is headed our way, and what we all can do to change it.

Panelists:

Ricardo Bayon (Moderator) is a Partner and a member of the Board of Directors of Encourage Capital. Ricardo leads the water team and new business and innovation at Encourage and works across several other investment sectors. For nearly two decades he has specialized on issues related to finance, banking, and the environment. He has done work for a number of organizations, including Insight Investments, the International Finance Corporation (IFC) of the World Bank, IUCN and The Nature Conservancy. Ricardo graduated with a B.A. degree from Brown University. He is a member of the Advisory Council of the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society.

Therese (Tess) Carter is a PhD candidate in atmospheric chemistry at MIT, working on fires and how they impact air quality, health, and climate, globally and with a focus on North America and Africa. Prior to MIT, Tess was the National Climate Assessment Program Coordinator at the US Global Change Research Program, which coordinates the climate science research of 13 federal agencies. She is a 2016 graduate (Honors) of Brown University with a B.S. degree in chemistry. She is a member of the Advisory Council of the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society.

Dr. Sarah Henderson is the Senior Environmental Health Scientist at the BC Centre for Disease Control, and an Associate Professor at the UBC School of Population and Public Health. She leads a program of applied research and surveillance to support environmental health policy for the province of British Columbia, and has been studying wildfire smoke exposure and its public health impacts for almost 20 years.

Dr. Paul Hessburg is a research ecologist who builds models of historical and modern era conditions in large forests and studies what factors make them behave as they do. He works for the USDA, Forest Service, at the Pacific Northwest Research Station. He has a doctorate in Forest Pathology from Oregon State University, and he has been working in forestry for 40 years. Paul has traveled and spoken to over 100 western US communities about the new era of megafires and what we can do about it.

Zach Knight is a co-Founder and the CEO of Blue Forest, a non-profit creating sustainable financial solutions to meet pressing environmental challenges. Prior to founding Blue Forest, Zach started his career in finance at Merrill Lynch where he specialized in structured finance. Zach also served as a high-yield and distressed corporate bond trader before leaving Wall Street to pursue an MBA at UC-Berkeley’s Haas School of Business with a focus on sustainability and environmental investing.

Professor David N. Pellow is the Dehlsen and Department Chair of Environmental Studies and Director of the Global Environmental Justice Project at the University of California, Santa Barbara where he teaches courses on environmental and social justice, race/class/gender and environmental conflict, human-animal conflicts, sustainability, and social change movements that confront our socioenvironmental crises and social inequality. He has volunteered for and served on the Boards of Directors of several community-based, national, and international organizations that are dedicated to improving the living and working environments for people of color, immigrants, indigenous peoples, and working class communities, including the Global Action Research Center, the Center for Urban Transformation, the Santa Clara Center for Occupational Safety and Health, Global Response, Greenpeace USA, and International Rivers.

Dr. Deepti Chatti is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Justice at Humboldt State University whose scholarship centers the social equity challenges that undergird sustainable development projects in the Global South. Dr. Chatti’s research critically analyzes development efforts to expand clean energy access and reduce air pollution exposures to historically underserved communities in rural India, and studies the politics and pragmatics of conducting transnational environmental research.

She is currently working on a book project focused on “clean cooking” household energy transitions which attempt to abolish the ubiquitous mud stove (mitti ka chulha) from the kitchens of rural India for a variety of health, environmental, and social reasons. This research is based on long-term multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork in the Indian Himalayas with cooks and families, and with interviews with cookstove engineers, designers, air pollution researchers, non-governmental organizations, and government policy makers. For several years she has been ethnographically studying a randomized control trial unfolding in two states in India that attempts to generate knowledge about poverty and climate change through field-based experiments. Her research contributes to scholarship in feminist political ecology, environmental justice, postcolonial science and technology studies, energy geographies, and South Asian studies.

Join the Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship for a panel discussion about how Brown alumni entrepreneurs have grown and adapted through times of uncertainty in their startups and careers. The panel will feature Ben Chesler ’15, co-founder of Imperfect Foods and Lisa Gelobter ’91, founder & CEO of tEQuitable, moderated by Scott Norton ’08, co-founder & CEO of Sir Kensington’s. As a founder, how do you maintain stability, encourage your team to embrace change, and internally cope with the uncertainty that lies ahead? How do you have the courage to listen to yourself and make decisions? And how do you think about what’s next for your startup?

Register here to attend. A Zoom link will be sent in the email confirmation. 

Albert Ko, MD
Chair, Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases
Yale School of Medicine
Department Chair and Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases) and of Medicine (Infectious Diseases); Department Chair, Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases

Dr. Ko’s research centers on the health problems that have emerged as a consequence of rapid urbanization and social inequity. He coordinates a research and training program on urban slum health in Brazil and is conducting prospective community-based studies on rat-borne leptospirosis, dengue, meningitis and respiratory infections. His research particularly focuses on understanding the transmission dynamics and natural history of leptospirosis, which is a model for an infectious disease that has emerged in slum environments due to the interaction of climate, urban ecology and social marginalization.

Sponsored by the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

The Decoding Disparities Lecture Series

The Decoding Disparities Lecture Series is sponsored by The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and the Brown School of Public Health to examine health inequity and to outline steps toward a more equitable and just health care system.

The series is supported by The Paul Levinger Professorship Pro Tem in the Economics of Health Care. This lecture was established in 1987 to honor the memory of Paul Levinger by a gift from his wife, Ruth N. Levinger, on behalf of the Levinger family. The Levingers’ daughter and son-in-law, Bette Levinger Cohen and John M. Cohen ’59, MD were instrumental in Mrs. Levinger’s decision to make this gift.

Continuing Medical Education Credit

This live activity is approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

Physicians: To be eligible to claim CME credit, please register for this event at cme-learning.brown.edu

Guest speaker: Michael Mascarenhas, University of California - Berkeley

What happened in Flint is a complicated story. Public hearings and written testimonies, task force reports, numerous civil law suits and criminal charges, hundreds of newspaper stories and scholarly articles, and numerous books have tried to capture some version of truth about what is generally known as the Flint Water Crisis (FWC). The majority of these documents and texts have tended to focus on neglect (of federal and state agencies, engineering firms, consultants, politicians, local government, academics, etc.). My interest in the FWC is not of neglect but rather the intent and close coordination of the battalion of architects and players (lawyers, engineering firms, corporate consultants and non-profits) committed to advancing austerity measures in Michigan. Austerity, as practiced in Michigan represents a particular manifestation of racialized power in the region, a new white political power that advances environmental racism through the colorblind discourse of austerity. This analysis is more consistent with activists and community claims that the mostly white (male) decision-makers are responsible for the FWC. In particular, I argue, that racialization is the x factor or determining variable that balances the math equation of austerity. And the more obscure the math the more the derivative of racialization is advanced into the logics of austerity. This framing of environmental racism draws on the scholarship of Joe Feagin, Sean Elias, Michelle Alexander, and others, and positions white agents, especially elite whites, explicitly at the forefront of analysis of environmental racism in Flint (Alexander, 2012; Feagin & Elias, 2013).

Alexander, M. (2012). The New Jim Crow. Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. Revised Edition. New York, NY: The New Press.

Feagin, J., & Elias, S. (2013). Rethinking Racial Formation Theory: a Systemic Racism Critique. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 36(6), 931-960.

Monica Huertas is a social worker, activist, and mother of four living in South Providence. Monica is founding member of the Racial And Environmental Justice Committee and Project Director for Green Justice Zones. She was the campaign coordinator for the environmental coalition No LNG in PVD, an effort to boost awareness about Fields Point, an area of South Providence already replete with toxic chemicals that is now slated to become a storage facility for liquefied natural gas (LNG). Her work includes efforts to ensure that local community members are part of decision-making efforts around environmental initiatives in their neighborhoods. In her talk, Huertas will discuss what she and other local activists are doing now to fight the corporations that hold sway in Providence, and get the community more involved in EJ efforts.

The Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship invites you to join a discussion on how founders and industry leaders are combatting the climate crisis, what it looks like to live in a carbon-constrained world, and how every entrepreneur can take action to add layers of sustainability into their business.

Featuring moderator Wendy Abrams ’87, P’21, environmentalist, founder of Cool Globes and panelists: Avi Garbow, Environmental Advocate at Patagonia, Wilson Hago, Ph.D. ’94, Founder & CEO at Hago Energetics, Inc., and Rachael Miller ’93, Founder/CEO at Cora Ball & Founder of Rozalia Project.

We encourage you to submit your questions to the panelists in the registration form.

Register here.

Nelson solar panels!
Virtual

Sustainability Showdown: Brown Strategic Plan

Show Details

Join the Office of Sustainability on October 14th at 4 pm, for the 2nd Sustainability Showdown. Director of Sustainability, Jess Berry, Sustainability Programs Manager, Erin Royal, and Data Scientist, Derek Wietsma will share updates and next steps for the creation of Brown’s first-ever Sustainability Plan. Learn about the priority areas set forth to tackle climate change and advance sustainability and how the university plans to take action.

Although the science of climate change is clear, policy decisions about how to respond to its effects remain contentious. Even when such decisions claim to be guided by objective knowledge, they are made and implemented through political institutions and relationships—and all the competing interests and power struggles that this implies. Michael Méndez tells a timely story of people, place, and power in the context of climate change and inequality. He explores the perspectives and influence low-income people of color bring to their advocacy work on climate change. In California, activist groups have galvanized behind issues such as air pollution, poverty alleviation, and green jobs to advance equitable climate solutions at the local, state, and global levels. Arguing that environmental protection and improving public health are inextricably linked, Mendez contends that we must incorporate local knowledge, culture, and history into policymaking to fully address the global complexities of climate change and the real threats facing our local communities.

John Balmes, MD
Professor of Medicine

University of California, San Francisco
Director, Northern California Center for Occupational and Environmental Health

Join Via Zoom

John R. Balmes is a Professor of Environmental Health Sciences whose research is focused on the respiratory, cardiovascular and metabolic health effects of various air pollutants and occupational agents.

Lecture support provided by the CardioPulmonary Vascular Biology COBRE.

Decoding Disparities Lecture Series

Decoding Disparities is supported by the Paul Levinger Professorship Pro Tem in the Economics of Health Care. It is sponsored by The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Brown School of Public Health to examine health inequity and to outline steps toward a more equitable and just health care system. This lecture was established in 1987 to honor the memory of Paul Levinger by a gift from his wife, Ruth N. Levinger, on behalf of the Levinger family. The Levingers’ daughter and son-in-law, Bette Levinger Cohen and John M. Cohen ’59, MD were instrumental in Mrs. Levinger’s decision to make this gift.

Continuing Medical Education Credit

This live activity is approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

Physicians: To be eligible to claim CME credit, please register for this event at cme-learning.brown.edu

 

This talk will launch IBES’s Fall ’20 Environmental Justice (EJ) Speaker Series.

Lennon will first offer a broad introduction to EJ activism and research, with a focus on connections across movements and moments. Building on these connections, he will then draw from his research to propose a praxis for forging “supply chain solidarities” in the solar energy industry between marginalized communities of color in the Global North and Global South. This praxis repurposes the EJ concept of co-pollutants to reimagine antiracist community-based solar campaigns in ways that deemphasize consumer power in the interest of people power. He suggests that such solidarities are essential to continuing the EJ movement’s tradition of forming connections as we work toward more inclusive green economies in a post-Covid world.

The Fall 2020 EJ seminar series will continue every other Friday throughout the fall semester.

When Ben Chesler was a student at Brown, he co-founded the Food Recovery Network with his friend Ben Simon, which reduces food waste on college campuses by repurposing uneaten, cooked food from campus dining halls. It was Simon who convinced Chesler at Brown in 2014 to think bigger about the problem of produce recovery. “I actually vividly remember Ben showing up at my apartment on Arnold Street my senior year with this huge-ass sweet potato, going, ‘Yo, this would normally go to waste. There’s a business here. We gotta do this”, explained Chesler. And the rest was history.

Chesler is one-third of the founding team behind the San Francisco Bay Area’s 2015 start-up Imperfect Foods, which aims to reduce food waste by recovering groceries that would normally go to waste on farms and throughout the supply chain, and delivering them to customers’ doors for up to 30% less than at a supermarket. Chesler, the company’s Chief Innovation Officer, estimates that nearly 20 percent of produce grown in the United States “never makes it to the human mouth in any form.” Imperfect Produce delivers produce that’s either “cosmetically challenged” or surplus. Imperfect now has over 200,000 customers across 25 markets and has rescued over 100 million pounds of food. They have donated millions of pounds of food to over 100 food banks and non-profits, and have supported over 200 growers to ensure they’re getting a fair price for everything they grow — even the curvy cucumbers and undersized apples.

Join us as Danny Warshay ’87, Executive Director for the Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship interviews his former ENGN 1010 student and dives more into the problem of food waste and how Ben discovered a solution with major impact.

Co-sponsored by the Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship and the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society.

IBES Tea Time

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: 101-102
Show Details

Come enjoy a hot beverage and snack, and listen to short, informal presentations by IBES scholars describing the work that excites them. Speakers will be:

  • Baylor Fox-Kemper, Associate Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences
  • Jon Nelson, Graduate Affiliate (Sociology)

Tea times are designed to increase interaction among IBES community members and foster a broader understanding of the diverse projects going on under the Institute’s umbrella. Join us!

The Future of Sustainable Investing is a premier conference in which attendees will drive critical conversations regarding the role of our financial systems, both domestically and internationally, in addressing 21st century concerns. For students, it will be an exclusive opportunity to sit side by side and work with industry professionals and academics to decide what the future of sustainable investing, and business more broadly, should look like. Beyond being an excellent networking opportunity, we will also be hosting a career fair at the end of the day for students to directly interface with a number of our sponsors, including D.E. Shaw, RBC, StepStone, and Goldman Sachs.

RSVP HERE! 


Instagram: @fsicon
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fsiconference/
Twitter: @FSIconference

The conference will open with a keynote speaker and throughout the day, it will progress with a variety of panels, a provided lunch, and a closing keynote. Following the last keynote, there will be breakout sessions led by the speakers and finally, from 5-7pm, FSICon will host a career fair. More information, as well as a full agenda, a speaker list, and our sponsors, can be found at: fsicon.com

Robert Krulwich

Guest Lecture: Robert Krulwich of Radiolab

Location: List Art BuildingRoom: Room 120
Show Details

Robert Krulwich just retired after 16 years as co-host of Radiolab, WNYC’s Peabody Award-winning program about ‘big ideas’ now one of public radio’s most popular shows. It is carried on more than 500 radio stations and its podcasts are downloaded over 9 million times each month. He is currently working with Ric Burns on a documentary on “The Hard Problem” of consciousness, a multipart interactive on climate change and is planning to co-host a conference for YouTubers, podcasters, designers and filmmakers from around the world in April 2020.

Coffee cup on table

IBES Tea Time

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: 101-102
Show Details

Come enjoy a hot beverage and snack, and listen to short, informal presentations by IBES scholars describing the work that excites them. Speakers will be:

  • Kathryn Catlin, Voss Postdoctoral Research Associate in Environment and Society
  • Henry Johnson, IT Systems Manager

Tea times are designed to increase interaction among IBES community members and foster a broader understanding of the diverse projects going on under the Institute’s umbrella. Join us!

A live panel discussion about offshore wind and commercial fishing presented by ‘Possibly’ and The Public’s Radio.

Rhode Island has the first five offshore wind turbines in the country, but hundreds more are planned for Southern New England, including several dozen that will provide electricity to the Ocean State.

Rhode Island is also home to a vibrant fishing industry, and fishermen are already coping with local waters that are warming as fast as anywhere on earth. Windmills will help slow climate change, but what will they do to our fisheries? Can trawlers and turbines co-exist?

Join ‘Possibly’ and The Public’s Radio for a live panel discussion about the complicated relationship between Rhode Island’s newest and oldest industries.

Tickets are free, but space is limited.

Reserve your spot at ThePublicsRadio.org/Possibly.

We want to include your questions in the discussion. Ask questions here.


Possibly is a co-production of the Institute at Brown For Environment and Society and the Public’s Radio

Readings and conversation between poet Joan Naviyuk Kane and historian Bathsheba Demuth

How do works like Jen Rose Smith’s forthcoming Indeterminate Natures: Race and Indigeneity in Ice-Geographies and Bathsheba Demuth’s Floating Coast: An Environmental History of the Bering Strait intersect with indigenous poetry? How have issues of gender, economic parity, and environmental justice informed or complicated indigenous poetics, and vice versa? This event will take up contemporary indigenous poetry’s relationship to the political imperatives of intensifying global concern. It will consider how indigenous poetry takes on questions of environmental harm, economic insecurity, and unstable regimes of governance—questions that Indigenous poetries situate in the long arc of U.S. and European colonialism. And thinking beyond the politics of emergency, it will ask how indigenous poetics carry forward systems and practices of relation that have given and continue to give steadfastness to tribal ways of life across generations.

Joan Naviyuk Kane is Inupiaq with family from King Island (Ugiuvak) and Mary’s Igloo, Alaska. A 2019-2020 Hilles Bush Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Kane was a 2018 Guggenheim Fellow in Poetry. Her publications include the essay collection A Few Lines in the Manifest (Albion Books, 2018), and poetry books and chapbooks The Cormorant Hunter’s Wife (NorthShore Press Alaska, 2009), Hyperboreal (Pitt Poetry Series, 2013), The Straits (Center for the Study of Place, 2015), Milk Black Carbon (Pitt Poetry Series, 2017), Sublingual (Finishing Line Press, 2018), and Another Bright Departure (CutBank, 2019). She has been the recipient of the Whiting Writer’s Award, the Donald Hall Prize in Poetry, the American Book Award, the Alaska Literary Award, the United States Artists Foundation Creative Vision Award, and fellowships and residencies from the Rasmuson Foundation, the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, the School for Advanced Research, the Aninstantia Foundation, the Hermitage Artist Retreat, and the Lannan Foundation. She has been a finalist for the PEN USA Literary Award, the Poetry Foundation’s Ruth Lilly Prize, and the Dorset Prize. She raises her sons as a single mother in Cambridge, and is one of the founding faculty of the graduate creative writing program at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Bathsheba Demuth is Assistant Professor of History and Environment & Society at Brown University, where she is also an affiliated faculty member in Native American and Indigenous Studies and Science and Technology Studies. An environmental historian, her research focuses on the lands and seas of the Russian and North American Arctic and on how the histories of people, ideas, places, and non-human species intersect. Her first book, Floating Coast: An Environmental History of the Bering Strait (Norton, 2019) examined capitalist and socialist attempts to transform the northern borderlands of both countries, while her new research turns to the Yukon River watershed and how rights for nonhuman beings have been conceived and codified across indigenous, imperial, and nation-state traditions.

Free, open to the public. This event is co-sponsored by the Department of History, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, Native American and Indigenous Studies Initiative, and Program in Science, Technology, and Society.

Latte art

IBES Tea Time

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: 101-102
Show Details

Come enjoy a hot beverage and snack, and listen to short, informal presentations by IBES scholars describing the work that excites them. Speakers are TBD.


Tea times are designed to increase interaction among IBES community members and foster a broader understanding of the diverse projects going on under the Institute’s umbrella. Join us!

Environmental Change, Societal Challenges and the Power of Financial Investments

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: 130
Show Details

As Amazonia burns, species go extinct, and sea level rises, profound challenges must be met to preserve the environmental integrity needed to sustain life on earth. Jeremy Grantham (acclaimed investor and climate change philanthropist) will provide a keynote presentation, “Race of Our Lives,” to set the context for the challenges we face. Ricardo Bayon (Partner, Encourage Capital) will moderate a panel discussion with leading figures in environmental and impact investing to explore the power of financial investments to help meet environmental challenges and positively impact the environment. Additional panelists will include: Sophie Purdom, Co-Author, Sustainable Investing: Revolutions in Theory in Practice Charlotte Kaiser, The Nature Conservancy Sarah Hoyt, Cambridge Associates Derek Strocher, Calvert Impact Capital

Latte art

IBES Tea Time

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: 101-102
Show Details

Come enjoy a hot beverage and snack, and listen to short, informal presentations by IBES scholars describing the work that excites them. Speakers will be:

  • Jiajue Chai, Postdoctoral Research Associate in Environment and Society
  • Clémence Bourcet, Visiting Research Fellow

Tea times are designed to increase interaction among IBES community members and foster a broader understanding of the diverse projects going on under the Institute’s umbrella. Join us!

Latte art

IBES Tea Time

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: 101-102
Show Details

Come enjoy a hot beverage and snack, and listen to short, informal presentations by IBES scholars describing the work that excites them. Speakers will be:

  • Jonathan Ryan, Voss Postdoctoral Research Associate in Environment and Society
  • KC Cushman, PhD student, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Tea times are designed to increase interaction among IBES community members and foster a broader understanding of the diverse projects going on under the Institute’s umbrella. Join us!

Event poster

Costs and Consequences of US Post-9/11 Wars: Focus on Climate Change

Location: Watson Institute for International and Public AffairsRoom: Joukowsky ForumCost: Free
Show Details

Greenhouse gas emissions from war were excluded from country reporting during the negotiation of the Kyoto Protocols. Yet, one of the consequences of war is increased use of fossil fuels. During this event, Neta Crawford, professor of political science and co-director of the Costs of War project, will discuss her recent research calculating the U.S. military’s greenhouse gas emissions associated with the post-9/11 wars.

Neta C. Crawford is a professor of political science and currently chairs the department of political science at Boston University. Her teaching focuses on international relations theory, international ethics, and normative change. Crawford received the Distinguished Scholar award from the International Ethics section of the International Studies Association in 2018.

Her research interests include international relations theory, normative theory, foreign policy decision making, sanctions, peace movements, discourse ethics, post-conflict peacebuilding, research design, utopian science fiction, and emotion. Crawford is also interested in methods for understanding the costs and consequences of war and is co-director of the Eisenhower Study Group “Costs of War” study (www.costsofwar.org) based at Brown University.

Latte art

IBES Tea Time

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: 101-102
Show Details

Come enjoy a hot beverage and snack, and listen to short, informal presentations by IBES scholars describing the work that excites them. Speakers will be:

  • Parker VanValkenburgh, Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Tea times are designed to increase interaction among IBES community members and foster a broader understanding of the diverse projects going on under the Institute’s umbrella. Join us!

Multiple people browsing research posters in hallway

Environmental GIS Poster Session

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: Lobby & 101-102
Show Details

Environmental GIS students will present posters on their independent research projects to faculty, students, staff and community members. Hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Topics will include: 

  • Current and Future Bioclimatic Trends in Kenya
  • Drought and the Spatiotemporal Distribution of California Grey Fox
  • Solar Panel Site Selection in Utqiaqvik, Alaska
  • Lidar-derived Green Roof Retrofits in Rochester, NY
  • Sea Level Rise Implications for Brown University
  • And, many more!

 For more information, please contact Samiah Moustafa.

Latte art

IBES Tea Time

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: 101-102
Show Details

Come enjoy a hot beverage and snack, and listen to short, informal presentations by IBES scholars describing the work that excites them. Speakers will be:

  • Juliane Schlag, Voss Postdoctoral Research Associate in Environment and Society
  • Ethan Kyzivat, PhD candidate, Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences

Tea times are designed to increase interaction among IBES community members and foster a broader understanding of the diverse projects going on under the Institute’s umbrella. Join us!

Blue Sky: Agility and the Possible in a Warming World will bring together art and science perspectives on imagined futures and science imaginaries as responses to global warming. Keynote lectures and scholarly panels will focus on bio- and geo-engineering, global governance and local action, contributions from the planetary sciences, and the alternative pathways we might take. There will be film screenings, an exhibition at the JCB Library, poster and flash lecture competition, and a visual arts program. The program is open to students and faculty, policy makers, community members, and others who care about the environment.

For more information, please visit brown.edu/go/bluesky

Macarena Gómez-Barris • “Forest Theory, Occupation, and an Archive of the Future”

Location: Cogut Institute, Pembroke HallRoom: 305
Show Details

April 11, 2019

The tree and the forest is the site of environmental humanities and multidisciplinary inquiry. By engaging the materiality of land, place, and the idea of the tree as knowledge, Macarena Gómez-Barris addressed the forest as a particular site of material and representational evacuation. Extending ideas from her book The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives (Duke University Press, 2017) on Indigenous aesthetics and social movements, Gómez-Barris considered modes of thinking about archives, counter-visuality, resistance, and recovery that work against the inevitability of the forest’s elimination. Where does the regenerative potential exist that challenges and moves us beyond the paradigm of no future?

Macarena Gómez-Barris is Professor and Chairperson of Social Science and Cultural Studies at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. She is also Director of the Global South Center (GSC), a research center that works at the intersection of social ecologies, art and politics, and decolonial methodologies. Her instructional focus is on Latinx and Latin American Studies, memory and the afterlives of violence, decolonial theory, the art of social protest, and queer femme epistemes. 

Gómez-Barris is the author of Where Memory Dwells: Culture and State Violence in Chile (UC Press, 2009), co-editor with Herman Gray of Towards a Sociology of the Trace (University of Minnesota Press, 2010), The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives (Duke University Press, 2017) and Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Politics in the Americas (University of California Press, 2018). 

Gómez-Barris is series editor, with Diana Taylor, of Dissident Acts, a Duke University Press Series, and was Fulbright Fellow at FLACSO-Quito in Ecuador (2014–15). She is the current co-editor with Marcial Godoy-Anatavia of e-misférica, an online trilingual journal on hemispheric art and politics (NYU). She is also a member of the Social Text journal collective.

This event, free and open to the public, was presented by the Environmental Humanities Initiative and co-sponsored by the C.V. Starr Lectureship Fund, the Watson Institute, the Departments of History and Religious Studies, the Program in Science, Technology, and Society, and the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society.

Blue Sky: Agility and the Possible in a Warming World will bring together art and science perspectives on imagined futures and science imaginaries as responses to global warming. Keynote lectures and scholarly panels will focus on bio- and geo-engineering, global governance and local action, contributions from the planetary sciences, and the alternative pathways we might take. There will be film screenings, an exhibition at the JCB Library, poster and flash lecture competition, and a visual arts program. The program is open to students and faculty, policy makers, community members, and others who care about the environment.

For more information, please visit brown.edu/go/bluesky

Blue Sky: Agility and the Possible in a Warming World

Location: John Carter Brown Library
Show Details

Blue Sky: Agility and the Possible in a Warming World will bring together art and science perspectives on imagined futures and science imaginaries as responses to global warming. Keynote lectures and scholarly panels will focus on bio- and geo-engineering, global governance and local action, contributions from the planetary sciences, and the alternative pathways we might take. There will be film screenings, an exhibition at the JCB Library, poster and flash lecture competition, and a visual arts program. The program is open to students and faculty, policy makers, community members, and others who care about the environment.

For more information, please visit brown.edu/go/bluesky

Rethinking ‘Wasteland’: Profit and Power in a 20th Century Chinese Borderland

Location: Barus and HolleyRoom: Room 190
Show Details

The relationship of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region to the modern Chinese nation-state is written onto its landscape. For Qing officials in the 18th and early 19th centuries, Xinjiang’s landscape was simply “wasteland” (huang), largely incapable of producing the grain needed to support the state’s administrative apparatus in the region. Beginning in the late 19th century but continuing throughout the 20th, multiple generations of Chinese officials grappled with the interrelated problems of “opening wasteland” and incorporating Xinjiang, a region located over 2,000 miles from Beijing, into the emerging Chinese nation-state. This effort to solve these two problems at once is the subject of my talk, which will reveal a new perspective on Xinjiang’s changing relationship to the Chinese nation, and offer insights onto the connection between landscapes and power in China and beyond. Judd C. Kinzley is associate professor of modern Chinese history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and author of Natural Resources and the New Frontier: Constructing Modern China’s Borderlands (University of Chicago Press, 2018).

The Edible Tide: How Estuaries and Migrants Transformed the Straits of Melaka, 1890-1940

Location: Urban Environmental LabRoom: Room 106
Show Details

The Straits of Melaka have long played a central role in the history of Southeast Asia, from facilitating the movement of people, ideas, and commodities to marking the edge of states and sultanates. Networks, circulations, and mobilities have, indeed, shaped our historical vision and historiographical understanding of this multi-scalar waterway. In this talk, however, guest speaker Anthony Medrano aims to chart a different kind of story, one that explores the Straits not as a place of passage but rather as a site of production. It is a story about how, and why, these muddy waters became an industrial fishing zone—an industrial estuary, as it were—in the wake of the nineteenth century. The talk draws on two episodes from both sides of the Straits for a pair of reasons. First, Medrano will think through how the environmental humanities might help us recast (Southeast) Asia in waters that are new, productive, and relevant to knowing the region in the age of climate change. Second, he will use these two episodes to explain why estuaries and migrants were central to Southeast Asia’s urban rise in the period from 1890 to 1940. By looking at the Straits during this pivotal moment, Medrano wants to explore how ecologies, beliefs, technologies, and cultures all mixed in ways that shaped not only the economic life of Southeast Asia’s estuaries, but also, and more importantly, the place of these estuaries in the economic life of Southeast Asia. Anthony Medrano is a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard University Center for the Environment.

Latte art

Towards Sustainable Water Resources Management: Case Studies in California and Ethiopia

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: 101-102
Show Details

Come enjoy a hot beverage and snack, and listen to a short presentation by guest lecturer Mekonnen Gebremichael, Associate Professor of Hydrology and Water Resources at UCLA.

Mekonnen Gebremichael Towards Sustainable Water Resources Management: Case Studies in California and Ethiopia

In this presentation, I will talk about recent findings on solving key challenges in the path towards sustainable water resources management under different climate and landuse conditions. Specifically, the focus is on three major themes - 1) hydrologic studies in data-scarce regions, 2) integrated water management under climate and landuse change, and 3) optimal usage of water resources under multiple competing constraints. I make use of satellite-based measurements of hydrologic fluxes, spatially distributed land surface models, and advanced optimization tools to address these issues. I will present results from successful case studies, including optimization of hydropower in East Africa and quantification of groundwater change in California’s Central Valley under climate change.


Dr. Gebremichael’s research interests are understanding and prediction of hydrological fluxes on a range of spatial and temporal scales, advancing the use of satellite observations for water resource applications, uncertainty analysis of hydrological estimations and forecasts, transboundary river basin management, water resource management and governance in developing countries, and impact of hydrological and climate changes on vector-borne diseases.

Latte art

IBES Tea Time

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: 101-102
Show Details

Come enjoy a hot beverage and snack, and listen to short, informal presentations by IBES scholars describing the work that excites them.

Presenters will include:

  • Jack Mustard, Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences
  • Jamie Hansen-Lewis, PhD candidate, Economics

Tea times are designed to increase interaction among IBES community members and foster a broader understanding of the diverse projects going on under the Institute’s umbrella. Join us!

Line drawing of Yangzi Wetlands

The Early Colonization of the Central Yangzi Wetlands

Location: Gerard HouseRoom: 101
Show Details

feat. Brian Lander, Assistant Professor of History and Environment and Society, Brown University

The wetlands of the Central Yangzi basin were once among the largest in China, but have since been converted into rice paddies and fish farms. They were seasonal wetlands, dry in winter but flooded each summer by the Yangtze and Han Rivers, so colonizing them required building and maintaining dikes to keep out the flood waters. Scholarship on the region has tended to focus on recent centuries, for which there is abundant evidence, but this paper will gather scattered references to agricultural colonization from historical documents to show that people were actively managing water control infrastructure in the region from the 1st millennium BCE to the fall of the Song Dynasty in 1279. The best documented aspect of this were the construction and gradual strengthening of the large dikes along the Yangtze River, but scattered textual references also reveal a host of smaller water control works that were constructed over the centuries, though we often know little more than their names and locations. When the Song court fled southwards in 1127 and founded the Southern Song in the lower Yangzi, the Jianghan Plain suddenly became a strategic military frontier, and the Song built both defensive canals and agricultural colonies.


Brian Lander is an environmental historian of early China who received his PhD in 2015 from Columbia University and is now assistant professor in the history department and a fellow at the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society. He studies the natural ecosystems of the core regions of Chinese civilization and how they were transformed over the millennia into agricultural landscapes.

If you would like to attend the event, please RSVP by filling out this form by Monday, March 4th, at noon. The form is also available at www.tinyurl.com/LanderEAC. We appreciate your cooperation in helping us get an accurate headcount and dietary information for the talk.


This event is sponsored by the East Asia Colloquium.

Latte art

IBES Tea Time

Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES)Room: 101-102
Show Details

Come enjoy a hot beverage and snack, and listen to short, informal presentations by IBES scholars describing the work that excites them.

This tea time will feature:

  • Sarah Cooley, PhD candidate, Earth, Environmental and Planetary Studies
  • Elizabeth Lord, Postdoctoral Research Associate in Environment and Society

Tea times are designed to increase interaction among IBES community members and foster a broader understanding of the diverse projects going on under the Institute’s umbrella. Join us!

America’s Climate Change Future: Housing Markets, Stranded Assets, and Entrenched Interests

Location: 111 Thayer StreetRoom: Joukowsky ForumCost: Free
Show Details

The Rhodes Center for International Economics, the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, and the Office of the President are pleased to announce a one day conference on the economic and political consequences of climate change. The conference focuses on three key areas. First, the economics of rising sea levels for real coastal estate markets, which comprise a large portion of US housing market growth and hence personal wealth. The economics of ‘stranded carbon assets.’ That is, the raw materials and financial assets tied up in carbon release that have a high current value but whose values could decline precipitously in the future, especially if ambitious action is undertaken as scientific consensus suggests is needed. The third is the organized politics of climate denial: who are the agents and institutions behind scientific disinformation and how can such a politics best be countered? A lunchtime keynote speech will be given by Rhode Island Senator Sheldon Whitehouse. Lunch will be provided for participants.

Joyce Chaplin • “The Franklin Stove: Heat and Life in the Little Ice Age”

Location: Cogut Institute, Pembroke HallRoom: 305
Show Details

January 31, 2019

Joyce Chaplin’s research examines climate change and climate science in eighteenth-century early America, focusing on awareness of and responses to the Little Ice Age. The invention and circulation of the Franklin stove is the central example of her study. Climate history is an important new subject for historians, given that public debates over climate and resource scarcity have become urgent. Belief that our dilemma is unprecedented is inaccurate and unhelpful, perhaps especially within the United States. Climate-change mitigation existed in the past and analysis of it reveals useful patterns of success and failure. Early American history has tended to emphasize non-environmental themes and events — especially the American Revolution as national pivot. But this history of politics, of human-to-human relations, was always entangled in human use and knowledge of the natural world. Early Americans themselves knew this. Benjamin Franklin knew he was living in an age of climate change, in response to which he designed a heating system and articulated a climate science. Both are significant. Franklin’s proposals about maximizing the production of heat from a minimal quantity of fuel were widely translated and discussed — they were profound Enlightenment statements about settler colonialism, resource conservation, and climate change.

Joyce E. Chaplin (BA Northwestern; MA and PhD, Johns Hopkins) is the James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History at Harvard University. A former Fulbright Scholar to the United Kingdom, she has taught at six universities on two continents, a peninsula, and an island, and in a maritime studies program on the Atlantic Ocean. Her most recent works include Round about the Earth: Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit (Simon & Schuster, 2012), and (with Alison Bashford) The New Worlds of Thomas Robert Malthus: Rereading the Principle of Population (Princeton University Press, 2016). She is the editor of Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography: A Norton Critical Edition (Norton, 2012) and Thomas Robert Malthus, An Essay on the Principle of Population: A Norton Critical Edition (Norton, 2017). Her reviews and essays have appeared in the Times Literary Supplement, the New York Times Book Review, and the London Review of Books. Her work has been translated into French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Estonian, and, forthcoming, into Turkish and Chinese. She is a current Guggenheim Fellow; she tweets @JoyceChaplin1.

This event, free and open to the public, was presented by the Environmental Humanities Initiative and was co-sponsored by the C.V. Starr Lectureship Fund, the Watson Institute, the Departments of History and Religious Studies, the Program in Science, Technology, and Society, and the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society.

November 15, 2018

On the climate front, events are moving from bad to worse with alarming speed. With fossil fueled neo-liberalism hurtling towards climate chaos and authoritarian populisms, where is there room for hope? In this talk, Damian White reflected on the contributions that mobilizations concern with just transitions running alongside a vibrant explosion of interest in design for transitions might make for re-grounding a political ecology of hope in dangerous times. The just transition is a concept that has its roots in the labor movement. Of late, it has been adopted by a broader array of forces: from democratic socialists to environmental and racial justice advocates, from feminists to decolonial-indigenous forces as a means of thinking about the political strategies and alliance building for moving post-carbon transitions forward. The emerging field of design for transitions equally is attempting to draw a broad range of design activists, radical municipalists, peer to peer hackers, commoners and others to think about the platforms, prototypes, cultural and design interventions that could aggregate multiple modes of redirective practice that could be unleashed to build post-carbon futures. At present, these currents often talk past each other. This paper explored tensions and conflicts emerging within both fields. It also reflected on the spaces for further engagement. There are of course no quick fixes or easy solutions to our climate crisis. But it is suggested that a post-carbon politics that is experimental, iterative and inventive in its outlook, marked by a degree of democratic maker-ly ambition and a post-carbon politics that foregrounds the potential creativity of labor has much to recommend itself.

Damian White is Professor of Social Theory and the Environment and Dean of Liberal Arts at the Rhode Island School of Design. He is the author of Bookchin: A Critical Appraisal (2008); Environments, Natures and Social Theory: Towards a Critical Hybridity (2016) and the co-editor of Technonatures (2009) and Autonomy, Solidarity, Possibility: The Colin Ward Reader (2011).

This event, free and open to the public, was presented by the Environmental Humanities Initiative and co-sponsored by the C.V. Starr Lectureship Fund, the Watson Institute, the Departments of History and Religious Studies, the Program in Science, Technology, and Society, and the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society.

Urgency in the Anthropocene

Location: John Carter Brown LibraryRoom: Reading RoomCost: Free
Show Details

In a talk, Amanda Lynch, director of the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society and a professor of Earth, environmental and planetary sciences, explores the ways in which the framing of the Anthropocene – the geological age in which we live today – is influencing climate policy and governance.

Sioux Surveillance: The Drone Warriors and the #NoDAPL Movement

Location: IBES Room 130, 85 Waterman Street
Show Details

This panel will explore how the Drone Warriors’ appropriation of military, turn commercial, technology provided a vital tool for the dissemination of Indigenous forms of aesthetic protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline.
Panelists:
- Myron Dewey, Founder, Digital Smoke Signals
- Lisa Parks, Global Media Technologies and Cultures Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
- Jennifer Weston, Associate Lecturer of Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston
Reception to follow.
A CSREA Faculty Grant Event organized by Adrienne Keene, Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies, and Gregory Hitch, Graduate Student in American Studies. Sponsored by the Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES) and Native Americans at Brown.

Conference • “Earth(ly) Matters: New Directions in Environmental Humanities”

Location: Cogut Institute, Pembroke HallRoom: 305
Show Details

In the context of current ecological crises, the environmental humanities has advanced a great number of vital and interrelated projects, both critical-diagnostic and aspirational-transformative. We aimed through this conference to promote a collective dialogue about this highly active field. 

Full video playlist of this conference.

Friday, April 6, 2018

Welcome and Introduction [Video]
Amanda Anderson, Brown University
Claire Brault, Brown University
Iris Montero, Brown University

Beyond the Human I: Suffering and Respect [Video]
Moderator: Tamara Chin, Brown University
Sharon Krause, Brown University • Political Respect for Nature
Branka Arsić, Columbia University • Marvelous Extinctions: Melville on Animal Suffering

Beyond the Human II: Sense-Making and Justice [Video]
Moderator: Jeffrey Moser, Brown University
Mark Cladis, Brown University • Racial and Environmental Justice in the Wild
Katherine Behar, Baruch College, City University of New York • What Makes Sense? Environmental Sensing and Nonhuman Sense

Blue Ecologies I [Video]
Moderator: Brian Lander, Brown University
Macarena Gómez-Barris, Pratt Institute • Disappearing Archipelagos
Astrida Neimanis, University of Sydney • 2067: The Sea and the Breathing

Introduction: Leela Gandhi, Brown University
Amitav Ghosh, Writer • Embattled Earth: Commodities, Conflict and Climate Change in the Indian Ocean Region
Presented as part of the OP Jindal Distinguished Lecture Series of the Center for Contemporary South Asia

Saturday, April 7, 2018

Exploring Methods I [Video]
Moderator: Iris Montero, Brown University
Kyle Powys Whyte, Michigan State University • Indigenous Science (Fiction) for the Anthropocene: Ancestral Dystopias and Settler Fantasies
Vera Candiani, Princeton University • The Costs of Environmental History: A View from Latin America

Blue Ecologies II [Video]
Moderator: Claire Brault, Brown University
Stacy Alaimo, University of Texas at Arlington • Composing Blue Ecologies: Science, Aesthetics, and the Creatures of the Abyss
Bathsheba Demuth, Brown University • Whales, Whalers, and Thinking the Ocean through Cetacean Labor

Exploring Methods II [Video]
Moderator: J. Timmons Roberts, Brown University
Dale Jamieson, New York University • Environmental Humanities: Problems and Prospects
Gregory Cushman, University of Kansas • How to Make the Environmental Humanities Central to Teaching Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies from the Start: A Case Study

Polar Opposites: Creative Interventions in the Arctic and Antarctica

Location: Granoff Center for the Creative Arts
Show Details

Polar Opposites: Creative Interventions in the Arctic and Antarctica
A Symposium on Arts and Environment
Thurs, Apr 5 and Fri, Apr 6, 2018 | Various times
Martinos Auditorium, Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, 154 Angell Street, Providence, RI
Free and open to the public | Registration required
As part of its three-year theme on Arts and Environment, the BAI brings together artists, advocates, scientists and researchers in a symposium addressing climate change in the polar regions. Artist and environmental activist David Buckland delivers the keynote. Participating Brown University faculty include Amanda Lynch, professor of earth, environmental and planetary sciences, and director of the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society (IBES); and Ed Osborn, associate professor of visual art. Related programming includes exhibitions, installations, film screenings and a concert. “Polar Opposites” is part of “WeatherProof: Arts, Humanities and Sciences Explore the Environment,” an integrated suite of activities among four other University programs.
Additional information can be found here: https://sites.google.com/a/brown.edu/polar-opposites/home Free registration is available here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/polar-opposites-symposium-tickets-43560341153.
Presented by the Brown Arts Initiative.

33° | a series of exhibitions and public artworks regarding ice melt and climate change

Location: List (Albert and Vera) Art Building
Show Details

March 31 – May 27, 2018
33° presents the work of six artists: Danish sound artist Jacob Kirkegaard and photographers Olaf Otto Becker, Camille Seaman, James Balog, Jean de Pomereu, and Iain Brownlie Roy. Kirkegaard’s forty-minute sound space Isfald (Icefall) will be on view at the David Winton Bell Gallery, alongside photographs of glaciers and the Greenland icesheet by Becker and Seaman. Photomurals by Becker, Seaman, Balog, de Pomereu, and Roy will be displayed on the exterior of buildings across Brown’s campus.
Location: Bell Gallery, List Art Lobby, and various sites on campus.
Bell Gallery Hours: 
Monday – Wednesday 11-4
Thursday 1-9
Friday 11-4

Meeting the Climate-Change Challenge: What Do We Know? What Should We Do?

Location: IBES 130 (Carmichael Auditorium)
Show Details

Dr. Holdren, who served as President Obama’s Science Advisor and the Director of the White Office of Science and Technology Policy through both Obama terms, was responsible for interpreting, for the President, the state of climate-change science and its implications for policy. The analyses he provided played a major role in shaping the Administration’s climate-change policy, including the President’s June 2013 Climate Action Plan. In this talk, he will update his assessment of what the science is telling us about the urgency of increased ambition in addressing the climate-change challenge and will reflect on the gulf between Obama’s stance on this issue and Trump’s.
Dr. John P. Holdren, Senior Advisor to the President, Woods Hole Research Center; Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Science and Policy, Harvard University Kennedy School of Government; and formerly President Obama’s Science Advisor and Director, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.
Dr. Holdren was President Obama’s Chief Science and Technology Advisor and the Senate-confirmed Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) from 2009 to 2017, becoming the longest-serving Science Advisor to the President in the history of the position (dating back to World War II). His responsibilities in this capacity included advising the President on all science and technology issues bearing on the President’s agenda (including economic growth and job creation, biomedicine and public health, energy and climate change, the oceans and the Arctic, the Nation’s space program, and national and homeland security); coordinating R&D strategy and budgets across all the Executive Branch departments and agencies; overseeing interagency S&T programs such as the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the National Nanotechnology Initiative; developing initiatives in STEM education and training; advancing scientific integrity and openness in government; and representing the U.S. government in interactions with the U.S. and global science and engineering communities.
Prior to joining the Obama administration, Dr. Holdren was the CEO of the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC), in addition to several other distinguished posts in science and academia. He rejoined WHRC in 2017 as a Senior Advisor to the President – a voluntary role providing strategic guidance, and helping WHRC to remain at the forefront of climate research and policy. He is also a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.
Dr. Holdren earned his B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his M.S. and Ph.D from Stanford University in aerospace engineering and theoretical plasma physics.
Co-sponsored by the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, the Watson Institute, and the Woods Hole Research Center.