Institute at Brown for Environment and Society
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Water and life from snow: A trillion dollar science question, a paper published in Water Resources Research by Visiting Scholar in Environment and Society Michael Goldstein, has been recognized as one of the journal's top downloaded papers.
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News from IBES

IBES students head for Fulbrights

Two IBES-affiliated seniors and one recent alumna have been awarded Fulbright Scholarships for the upcoming year, embodying Brown's tradition of being the top Fulbright-producing university in the country.
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Meltwater from Greenland’s ice sheet is a leading contributor to global sea level rise, and a Brown University study shows that an underappreciated factor — the position of the snowline on the ice sheet — plays a key role in setting the pace of melting.
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In a finding that has implications for how scientists calculate natural greenhouse gas emissions, a new study finds that water levels in small lakes across northern Canada and Alaska vary during the summer much more than was assumed.
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January in Australia brought record high temperatures, intense winds, and extreme flash-flooding events. And despite Australia's normally hot climate, the heat seen there in recent days is more extreme than ever.
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Chris Horvat, a postdoctoral scholar whose regular research on polar ice floes is temporarily derailed by the government shutdown, is using a strange ice disk (and internet sensation) as a research analog for sea ice.
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Providence business leaders joined the Rhode Island academic community Jan. 15 and 16 for the "Providence Resiliency Workshop," an event hosted at the University and designed to highlight the challenges climate change presents for Providence.
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When Bathsheba Demuth '06, '07 AM decided to go for a hike on her first day in Old Crow, Yukon, she didn't realize it was grizzly bear season. Walking on a trail through dense undergrowth, Demuth soon came across a large paw print filling with water. Looking down, Demuth saw her own tracks begin to submerge. The grizzly lurked just ahead.
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Centuries ago, the eastern coast of Brazil was home to a flourishing rainforest twice the size of Texas. Today, that forest—called the Mata Atlantica, or Atlantic Forest—is a shadow of its former self. Hundreds of years of deforestation and development have reduced the Mata Atlantica to just 15% of its historical extent, causing mass habitat loss and threatening its globally-unmatched biodiversity.
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Lynch, a climate scientist who is active in environmental policy research, will discuss the implications of the rapidly advancing Anthropocene and the intersection of environmental policy and human rights.
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The Rhode Island of yesteryear was famous for its bustling manufacturing sector. Between the late-18th and mid-20th centuries, a world-class network of textile mills, jewelry-making factories, and other industrial facilities bloomed across the center of the state.
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It is 1998 and Nancy Jacobs stands awestruck at Lake Baringo in Kenya, floored by the immense wisdom of a local bird guide. Globally known as a birdwatcher's paradise, the lake is home to more than 350 species of birds—and the guide seemed to know all of them.
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The Program for Environmental and Civic Engagement (PECE), a new initiative of the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society (IBES), is excited to announce a new collaboration with the Jonathan M. Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship.
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News from IBES

Introducing: Kai Bosworth

Human geographer Kai Bosworth has always been fascinated by environmental social movements surrounding land ethics, especially in the rural American Midwest and West.
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The Earth Science Women's Network, an international peer-mentoring organization for women in the geosciences, has received a national honor for its work in creating a supportive community for thousands of scientists.
IBES fellow and Associate Professor of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences Meredith Hastings is co-founder and President of the organization.
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At 80 degrees North, the ice edge draws an abundance of marine life: sunlight-loving phytoplankton, schools of coldwater fish, and hundreds of diving, rolling narwhal crooning an eerie tune. At the outset of his Arctic research adventure last summer, Voss Postdoctoral Fellow Chris Horvat pitched a tent and basked in the serenity of the otherworldly polar scene.
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Today, the Sumatran rhinoceros, true to its name, is a tropical animal native only to remote mountains; however, as recently as a few thousand years ago, this creature thrived across an enormous range—from the tropics to North China. This, according to new research by Brian Lander in Current Biology.
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