Institute at Brown for Environment and Society
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Lynch, a climate scientist who is active in environmental policy research, will discuss the implications of the rapidly advancing Anthropocene and the intersection of environmental policy and human rights.
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The Rhode Island of yesteryear was famous for its bustling manufacturing sector. Between the late-18th and mid-20th centuries, a world-class network of textile mills, jewelry-making factories, and other industrial facilities bloomed across the center of the state.
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It is 1998 and Nancy Jacobs stands awestruck at Lake Baringo in Kenya, floored by the immense wisdom of a local bird guide. Globally known as a birdwatcher's paradise, the lake is home to more than 350 species of birds—and the guide seemed to know all of them.
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The Program for Environmental and Civic Engagement (PECE), a new initiative of the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society (IBES), is excited to announce a new collaboration with the Jonathan M. Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship.
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News from IBES

Introducing: Kai Bosworth

Human geographer Kai Bosworth has always been fascinated by environmental social movements surrounding land ethics, especially in the rural American Midwest and West.
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The Earth Science Women's Network, an international peer-mentoring organization for women in the geosciences, has received a national honor for its work in creating a supportive community for thousands of scientists.
IBES fellow and Associate Professor of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences Meredith Hastings is co-founder and President of the organization.
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At 80 degrees North, the ice edge draws an abundance of marine life: sunlight-loving phytoplankton, schools of coldwater fish, and hundreds of diving, rolling narwhal crooning an eerie tune. At the outset of his Arctic research adventure last summer, Voss Postdoctoral Fellow Chris Horvat pitched a tent and basked in the serenity of the otherworldly polar scene.
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Today, the Sumatran rhinoceros, true to its name, is a tropical animal native only to remote mountains; however, as recently as a few thousand years ago, this creature thrived across an enormous range—from the tropics to North China. This, according to new research by Brian Lander in Current Biology.
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News from IBES

Kartzinel elected ESA Early Career Fellow

Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Tyler Kartzinel has been elected an Early Career Fellow of the Ecological Society of America.
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News from IBES

Former Obama aide Holdren delivers lecture at IBES

Dr. John P. Holdren, Senior Advisor to the President at Woods Hole Research Center and former Science Advisor and Director to President Barack Obama, visited the Institute on Thursday, February 15th and delivered a lecture entitled "Meeting the Climate-Change Challenge: What Do We Know? What Should We Do?"
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News from IBES

Braun recognized as public health pioneer

IBES fellow Joseph Braun has been named one of 20 Pioneers Under 40 in Environmental Public Health by the Collaborative on Health and the Environment (CHE), a prestigious resource for evidence-based science and shared knowledge regarding human health.
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Over two weeks in November, 15 students from the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society's Climate and Development Lab have been embedded in key organizations at talks in Bonn, Germany of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
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For many, the title theoretical physicist conjures images of wild-haired scholars poring over complex equations in an effort to solve esoteric scientific problems. But Brad Marston, Professor of Physics, is not wild-haired. And the problem he seeks to tackle is far more down-to-Earth than those stereotypes would lead one to believe.
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The sprawling volcanic islands of Indonesia are famed for their lush, tropical flora; but during the last ice age, the region's rainforests were instead dry savannas where it rained only half as much as it does today.
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